Archive for December, 2017

2017 Puzzle Review

Many of you know of the puzzle mania that characterizes our home.

Here’s the latest one we’re working on (well, mostly the Rufer part of the family). It’s a collage of foods from yesteryear, some of which are still around, some not.

"Things I Ate As a Kid"

If you want to see the complete inventory of puzzles from 2017 and years past, here’s the link:

http://rrufer.com/wordpress_1284833715/

Note: The Rufer puzzle blog does not accept comments, but The Real Me does, so feel free to comment here! And, above all,

Happy New Year!

Best of 2017

Might as well face it. SOMEONE is bound to ask our favorite book of 2017.

I’m ready.

How about I name my favorite authors for each country I’ve “visited” in 2017?

• Denmark: Jussi Adler-Olsen, “The Keeper of Lost Causes” and others.

• Norway: Karin Fossum, “Hell Fire” and others.

• Iceland: Arnaldur Indridason, “Reykjavik Nights” and others.

• Scotland: Peter May, “The Black House” and others.

• Britain: Mo Hayder, “The Treatment” and others.

• Russia: Joseph Kanon (American), “Defectors” and others.

What they all have in common: an intense darkness and sense of place. In each case, there is a brooding presence that is the main character, an unrelenting heaviness that is frightening and comforting at the same time.

Nothing in the US, you ask? Sort of.

• New York: James Patterson’s “NYPD Red” series is fun!

And why don’t I slip in a little BSP — a Christmas short story: The Neon Ornaments – find out how Gloria Lamerino and Matt Gennaro met, one Christmas season!

Reconnect with Gloria, Matt, Rose, and Frank

O Christmas tree

Two scenes from a recent jaunt to New York City.

Can you figure out the exact location?

How about this one -- where am I?

A few of My Favorite Things

In case you missed this list on Lois Winston’s blog a couple of weeks ago, I’m reprinting here.

Here are some of my favorite things, in various categories:

Element of the periodic table — Polonium, #84, the first element discovered by Marie Curie, and named for her native Poland.

Crime drama — “Ray Donovan,” because of Liv Schreiber, Jon Voight, the Boston accents, and the dark, dark mood: “You don’t want to know what really happened.”

Scientist— Enrico Fermi, “the architect of the nuclear age,” for better or worse, and author of one of my favorite quotes.

Favorite quote #1, from FermiBefore I came here I was confused about this subject. Having listened to your lecture, I am still confused. But on a higher level.

Female crime writer — Patricia Highsmith, because she gave us Tom Ripley.

Drink — very dry decaf cappuccino with whole milk (Reminds me of that scene in “LA Story,” where no one is ordering a simple coffee.) https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=08NkaqoOELg

Favorite quote #2 There are some people that if they don’t know, you can’t tell them. – Louis Armstrong. (Know anyone who fits this description?)

Favorite animals — the lions, Patience and Fortitude, outside the New York Public Library.

Mathematician — Countess Ada Lovelace, Lord Byron’s daughter and the world’s first programmer, not because she was an addictive gambler, but because many people think she’s an acronym. ADA, the Department of Defense programming language is named after her. And so is Ada Madison, one of my pen names.

Museum — one with a Hopper, a Stieglitz, a Wharhol, and a coffee shop.

Sport — whatever is off season.

Male crime writer — Stephen King, because I’m only one degree of separation from him (My first agent was his first editor. Or is that two degrees?), and because he hugged me when I handed him his Edgar for “Mr. Mercedes.”

All-round great Author — Joyce Carol Oates, because she’s on my mind. She was featured in the NYTimes, 10/23/17, as part of the Set the Page Free project, between Xerox and the literary community. And because she’s written a gazillion books that I love, from “Them” in 1969 to “We Were the Mulvaneys” in 1996 to “The Man Without a Shadow” in 2016. She’s quoted in the article as saying “I like to write.” Really, Ms. Oates? Tell us what you don’t like to do.

Sunset lined up with 42nd Street, on a summer evening.

•  Street — 42nd in Manhattan, running from the East River to the Hudson River. In between are the United Nations, the Chrysler Building, Grand Central Terminal, the New York Public Library, Times Square, and one or two theaters and eateries. Hmm, maybe it’s time for a visit!